To All the Hero Moms: Veteran’s Day

Hero Mom

Nearly every mom I know is a self sacrificing hero. Obviously they aren’t perfect. But they willfully give of themselves over and over.

Heroes.

Each of them.

But when “Terra” looked down at her shoes and told me, “My mom’s going to Iraq.”

I didn’t have an adequate response. Her words blindsided me.

I wish I had this book to offer.  I didn’t then. But I’m ready for the next time.

Bryan Landgo offers a tribute (strikingly similar to Hero Dad) to thank the families of these heroes. Even if you don’t have military families in your community, this book acts as a reminder of those who sacrifice for their country and family.

And here’s my usual  disclaimer:

I’m not writing to condone or condemn U.S. foreign policy. I’ve been pleased with U.S. foreign policy and I’ve protested such matters. But those complicated topics are for a political blog that I’ll write when I get 9 more lives. This is about saying thank you to those that serve our country.

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Veterans Day: The Wall

The Wall

Eve Bunting made a career out of writing about topics few in the picture book world would even consider. The Wall is another offering from the land of taboo topics. This time it’s the Vietnam Memorial, which means that war and death are on the docket.

In Buntings story a father and son are visiting the wall to see Dad/Grandpa’s name. This is a children’s book, so she guides us through these topics gently. But the pain and loss are real, real enough for me to think over whether or not I would get an angry parent phone call for reading about death in school.

In the end I chose to read it. Those who served and made the ultimate sacrifice deserve to be honored, and Bunting masterfully delivered this book with reverence fitting the fallen.

To all the Hero Dads (and Moms) on Veterans Day

Hero Dad

Being a military family is hard… extremely hard.

No, I’m not speaking from experience. Yes, I’ve known a few: from the pilot of Air Force 2 (the VP’s jet) to the private mopping floors and a bunch in between. For the record, none of them said, “I’m living the dream!”

No.  Pulling up stakes and moving your family around the world (or the country) every few years is tough. Being gone often and for undisclosed amounts of time to undisclosed locations is tough on the whole family. (It’s not called the service for nothing.)

Occasionally my students’ Dads (and once in a great while, moms) get deployed. That’s difficult for kids to understand.  So, would it hurt to thank the Hero Dads (and their families)? I hope not.

And a side note:

I’m posting about this book because I believe that you should respect those who willingly enlist and serve knowing that it may cost them their lives: regardless of which side of the aisle the Commander in Chief happen to have come from.

I’m not writing to condone or condemn U.S. foreign policy. I’ve been pleased with U.S. foreign policy and I’ve protested such matters. But those complicated topics are for a political blog that I’ll write when I get 9 more lives. This is about saying thank you to those that serve our country.