A Conversation Worth Having

TheOtherSide

There really aren’t a plethora of picture books that talk about segregation in 1950ish small town America from the perspective of a young black girl.  Admittedly, it’s a narrow niche.  But even if it was a Dr. Seuss sized portion of the market, this story would hold its own.

Woodson tells the tale of two girls that become unlikely friends at the fence that racially divides their town.  This book serves beautifully as the bridge into discussing race relations with children.  They are captivated by the tension in the story; and even though the physical fences are gone, it’s obvious that we still need to work toward reconciling.

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